Linden

Botanical Name: Tilia spp.

Other Common Names: Linden, Basswood

Brief Description and Notes: A notable feature of the Linden leaves is that they are heart-shaped and serrated. The leaves of the Tilia americana, which is native to our region, are asymmetrical hearts, whereas the common but non-native Tilia cordata has more symmetrically heart-shaped leaves. Both have small but fragrant and medicinal flowers in late spring/early summer.

Where To Look For It: Deep and moist nitrogen-rich soil that isn’t acidic; often associates with Sugar Maple and White Ash. 

Ornamental Value: Tall and stately shade and street trees

Ecological Value & Roles: Especially loved by butterflies, native bees, and honey bees. Creates dense shade. 

Edibility and Other Human Use: The flowers are a gentle and cooling/relaxing medicine often used as tea;  often used to ease anxiety, grief, cramps, poor circulation, fever, and more.  The leaf can also be used medicinally although it isn’t as fragrant. 

 

Sources:

Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

Missouri Botanical Garden

USDA Forest Service: American Basswood